Prosody, Morphology, Phonology and Multisyllabic W...
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Prosody, Morphology, Phonology and Multisyllabic Word Reading


Funder

Self-Funded

Project Team

Jodie Enderby, Prof. Julia Carroll, Dr. Helen Breadmore, Dr. Andrew Holliman, Dr. Luisa Tarczynski-Bowles


Project Objectives

The project examines the roles of morphological, phonological and prosodic knowledge in reading and spelling words with multiple syllables in children aged 7-11 years.


Impact Statement

We hope that this project will provide us with further insight of a newly emerging side of literacy research as it incorporates the metalinguistic skill of prosody. It is also focusing on these multiple syllable (multisyllabic) words, which reach peak importance for reading development during the later stages of primary school.

Critically, gaining an understanding of these predictors for these ages can help to inform teaching resources as well as potentially leading to applicable interventions for children who may be behind with their reading development. It also seeks to challenge the current existing models of reading for their inclusion of this important aspect of reading multisyllabic words.